Abstract

The aim of this study is to look at how the work of interpreting is discussed in the classroom. The focus was specifically on the language content and types of feedback being modeled by the instructors to the interpreting students. Data was collected through observations of an Interpreting II and Interpreting III course at San Antonio College. The hypothesis was that there would be a notable difference in the feedback given based on the level of student as well as a decrease in how often the feedback utterances of the students were reframed or redirected. The data showed negligible differences in the type and content of the feedback given by both instructors at the two different levels of the interpreting courses. The data illuminated the need for the incorporation of more appreciation feedback. Further research on how interpreters, mentors, interpreting educators and students discuss the work of interpreting is needed. The hope is that by implementing strategies that encourage and foster effective discussions universally we will then change the culture of horizontal violence that is prevalent in the field.

Exit Requirement

Thesis

Date of Award

12-10-2021

Degree Name

Master of Arts in Interpreting Studies

Department

Deaf Studies/Professional Studies

Committee Chair

Amanda Smith

Committee Member

Sarah Hewlett

Committee Member

Tom Cox

Language

eng

Type (DCMI Terms)

Text

Subject Categories

Education | Other Languages, Societies, and Cultures

Rights Statement URL

http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/

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