Abstract

Since the implication of federal laws, such as Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and the Americans with Disability Act (ADA) Deaf and Hard of Hearing children are able to attend public school districts (Seal, 2004). While an educational interpreter is working in a unique setting, often alone, it is important to have an administrator and network of professionals to reach out to share successes with and to have support from, in times of need. Through personal experiences and conversation with colleagues, it has been shared that working relationships between educational interpreters and their administrator can vary. This thesis identifies who is being assigned as an administrator to educational interpreters and it looks at the working relationships that educational interpreters have with their administrator. Data relating to current working relationships between educational interpreters and their administrators was gathered via an online survey. This survey was sent out across the United States to collect a range of perspectives from educational interpreters. This thesis also takes a look at the personalities of educational interpreters, as well as their administrators and how that could impact their working relationships. It is the hope that the research found can act as a basis for educational interpreters to conduct conversations around creating, building, and maintaining a working relationship with their administrators to ensure their success in the field.

Exit Requirement

Thesis

Date of Award

2-25-2021

Degree Name

Master of Arts in Interpreting Studies

Committee Chair

Amanda Smith

Committee Member

Erin Trine

Committee Member

Julie Holma

Keywords

educational interpreters, relationships, administration, mainstream, education, deaf, hard of hearing, deafblind

Subject Categories

Education | Other Languages, Societies, and Cultures

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