Publication Date

2020

Abstract

In the Foreword to Gerard Robinson and Elizabeth English Smith’s Education for Liberation volume on educational initiatives in prison, Newt Gingrich and Van Jones note that educational programs “do something powerful: they give hope and dignity to the incarcerated.” The authors wholeheartedly agree and while they recognize the importance of higher education programs that confer degrees and therefore credentials out in the free world, they find that education can be broadly understood in prison in ways that greatly enhance the hope and dignity of the incarcerated. In this chapter, they explore the creation of a Japanese-style healing garden at the Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP), a maximum security, 2,000-person male prison in Salem, Oregon. This prisoner-led initiative was a resounding success, despite all the odds against it, because it was animated by a philosophy of transformative justice that both prison administration and prisoners could believe in, and it embraced the need for meaningful and inclusive community partnerships.

Publisher

IGI Global

Language

eng

Type (DCMI Terms)

Text

Type

Article

Department

Criminal Justice

First Page Number

281

Last Page Number

301

DOI

10.4018/978-1-7998-3056-6.ch011

Rights Statement

Western Oregon University Library has determined, as of 07/22/2020, this item is in copyright. Users may use the item in accordance with copyright limitations and exceptions, including fair use.

Included in

Criminology Commons

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