Publication Date

8-2011

Abstract

Conceptions of well-being are cognitive representations of the nature and experience of well-being. These conceptions can be described generally by the degree to which hedonic and eudaimonic dimensions are emphasized as important aspects of the experience of well-being. In two studies, the prediction that eudaimonic dimensions of individual conceptions of well-being are more robustly associated with self-reported well-being than hedonic dimensions was investigated. Correlational analyses indicated that both hedonic and eudaimonic dimensions were associated with well-being, with more robust associations observed between the eudaimonic dimension and each measure of well-being. In several regression analyses, only the eudaimonic dimension significantly predicted well-being, with the hedonic dimension failing to account for unique variance in well-being beyond that predicted by the eudaimonic dimension. Results thus generally suggest that conceptualizing well-being in eudaimonic terms may be relatively more important for positive psychological functioning.

Publisher

Springer

Type (DCMI Terms)

Text

Journal

Social Indicators Research

Volume Number

103

Issue Number

1

First Page Number

93

Last Page Number

108

DOI

10.1007/s11205-010-9698-0

Type

Article

Department

Psychology

Comments

This is the author's accepted manuscript. The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11205-010-9698-0

Rights

In Copyright (InC)

Included in

Psychology Commons

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