Title

Sex Differences in Response to Jealousy in a Romantic Relationship

Date

5-31-2018 5:00 PM

End Time

31-5-2018 7:00 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Session Chair

Jaime Cloud

Session Chair

Brent King

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences poster Session

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Jaime Cloud

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Evolutionary psychologists have sought to explore if jealousy within a romantic relationship is an adaptation mechanism in response to an external threat. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the difference between men and women, and their response to a perceived sexual or emotional affair in a committed romantic relationship. It was hypothesized that men and women’s jealousy ratings will depend on affair type, such that women will report greater distress over emotional infidelity than sexual infidelity, whereas the opposite would be true for men. Participants were asked to imagine being in a committed romantic relationship, and then were randomly assigned to read a text message that indicated their partner was having either a sexual affair or an emotional affair. After reading one of the two messages, participants were asked to rate on a 7-point Likert scale how distressed they felt while reading the text message. Data will be analyzed using a 2 x 2 Analysis of Variance. Implications of the obtained findings and future directions will be discussed.

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May 31st, 5:00 PM May 31st, 7:00 PM

Sex Differences in Response to Jealousy in a Romantic Relationship

WUC Pacific Room

Evolutionary psychologists have sought to explore if jealousy within a romantic relationship is an adaptation mechanism in response to an external threat. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the difference between men and women, and their response to a perceived sexual or emotional affair in a committed romantic relationship. It was hypothesized that men and women’s jealousy ratings will depend on affair type, such that women will report greater distress over emotional infidelity than sexual infidelity, whereas the opposite would be true for men. Participants were asked to imagine being in a committed romantic relationship, and then were randomly assigned to read a text message that indicated their partner was having either a sexual affair or an emotional affair. After reading one of the two messages, participants were asked to rate on a 7-point Likert scale how distressed they felt while reading the text message. Data will be analyzed using a 2 x 2 Analysis of Variance. Implications of the obtained findings and future directions will be discussed.