Title

Effects of Semantic Satiation and Age on Free Recall

Date

5-31-2018 5:00 PM

End Time

31-5-2018 7:00 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Session Chair

Jaime Cloud

Session Chair

Brent King

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences poster Session

Presentation Type

Poster session

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Jaime Cloud

Abstract

Semantic satiation is a specific form of habituation that occurs following repeated exposure to a word. The current study sought to analyze the effects of semantic satiation on free recall, and how age affects sensitivity to semantic satiation. I predicted that satiation of a target word would make the cognitive task of recalling a word list harder, and that 1) participants in the single-repetition group would remember more words than the participants in the multiple-repetition group, 2) participants in the older group would recall fewer words overall than participants in the younger group, and 3) participants in the older group would show a smaller difference between the single repetition group and the multiple-repetition group than participants in the younger group, resulting from decreased sensitivity to semantic satiation effects. Data will be analyzed using a 2 x 2 Analysis of Variance. Implications of the obtained findings and future directions will be discussed.

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May 31st, 5:00 PM May 31st, 7:00 PM

Effects of Semantic Satiation and Age on Free Recall

WUC Pacific Room

Semantic satiation is a specific form of habituation that occurs following repeated exposure to a word. The current study sought to analyze the effects of semantic satiation on free recall, and how age affects sensitivity to semantic satiation. I predicted that satiation of a target word would make the cognitive task of recalling a word list harder, and that 1) participants in the single-repetition group would remember more words than the participants in the multiple-repetition group, 2) participants in the older group would recall fewer words overall than participants in the younger group, and 3) participants in the older group would show a smaller difference between the single repetition group and the multiple-repetition group than participants in the younger group, resulting from decreased sensitivity to semantic satiation effects. Data will be analyzed using a 2 x 2 Analysis of Variance. Implications of the obtained findings and future directions will be discussed.