Title

Not in MY Forest: The Interaction of Connectedness to Nature and Environmental Alteration

Date

5-31-2018 5:00 PM

End Time

31-5-2018 7:00 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Session Chair

Jaime Cloud

Session Chair

Brent King

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences poster Session

Presentation Type

Poster session

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ethan McMahan

Abstract

The present study investigated whether those high in dispositional nature connectedness differed in emotional responses to human-altered versus nature-altered natural environments. The hypothesis of the current research was that dispositional nature connectedness would interact with the alteration history of the natural environment, such that those high in nature connectedness, relative to those lower in nature connectedness, would respond more negatively to human-altered versus nature-altered environments. Participants watched a photographic slideshow depicting a natural area and read a vignette that varied between participants that stated that the environment was human-altered or nature-altered. Participants then completed a series of instruments measuring emotional state. Results indicated that individuals high in nature connectedness responded more negatively to human-altered environments than nature-altered environments, while individuals with low nature connectedness responded less negatively to human-altered environments. These findings indicate that emotional responses to natural environment depend on the characteristics of the environment and an individual’s dispositions.

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May 31st, 5:00 PM May 31st, 7:00 PM

Not in MY Forest: The Interaction of Connectedness to Nature and Environmental Alteration

WUC Pacific Room

The present study investigated whether those high in dispositional nature connectedness differed in emotional responses to human-altered versus nature-altered natural environments. The hypothesis of the current research was that dispositional nature connectedness would interact with the alteration history of the natural environment, such that those high in nature connectedness, relative to those lower in nature connectedness, would respond more negatively to human-altered versus nature-altered environments. Participants watched a photographic slideshow depicting a natural area and read a vignette that varied between participants that stated that the environment was human-altered or nature-altered. Participants then completed a series of instruments measuring emotional state. Results indicated that individuals high in nature connectedness responded more negatively to human-altered environments than nature-altered environments, while individuals with low nature connectedness responded less negatively to human-altered environments. These findings indicate that emotional responses to natural environment depend on the characteristics of the environment and an individual’s dispositions.