Title

Benefits of a Deaf Interpreter in DeafBlind Settings

Date

5-31-2018 1:00 PM

End Time

31-5-2018 3:00 PM

Location

WUC Summit

Session Chair

Chien-Chun Lin

Session Title

Deaf Studies and Professional Studies posters

Presentation Type

Poster session

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Heather Holmes, CM Hall

Abstract

DeafBlind interpreting has been increasing in popularity over the past decade, and due to the fact that DeafBlind people have a combined vision and hearing loss, often a native user of American Sign Language is preferred. This presentation will cover the benefits of utilizing a Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) or a Deaf Interpreter (DI) when working with DeafBlind individuals. Native ASL users possess a unique instinct to pick up on nuances and the skill to predict which direction the conversation is heading. Research has indicated that Deaf interpreters have been working with two linguistic groups (hearing and Deaf) of people since the 1970’s, when they were first recognized as professionals. Deaf interpreters are able to receive and convey visual cues, such as the physical environment, people present, or mood of the room. A new language is emerging in the DeafBlind community called protactile ASL. Deaf interpreters are learning to use this language with DeafBlind consumers. It gives them freedom to express themselves in a more organic way. DeafBlind interpreting is a very involved process and requires years of experience working closely with the community.

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May 31st, 1:00 PM May 31st, 3:00 PM

Benefits of a Deaf Interpreter in DeafBlind Settings

WUC Summit

DeafBlind interpreting has been increasing in popularity over the past decade, and due to the fact that DeafBlind people have a combined vision and hearing loss, often a native user of American Sign Language is preferred. This presentation will cover the benefits of utilizing a Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) or a Deaf Interpreter (DI) when working with DeafBlind individuals. Native ASL users possess a unique instinct to pick up on nuances and the skill to predict which direction the conversation is heading. Research has indicated that Deaf interpreters have been working with two linguistic groups (hearing and Deaf) of people since the 1970’s, when they were first recognized as professionals. Deaf interpreters are able to receive and convey visual cues, such as the physical environment, people present, or mood of the room. A new language is emerging in the DeafBlind community called protactile ASL. Deaf interpreters are learning to use this language with DeafBlind consumers. It gives them freedom to express themselves in a more organic way. DeafBlind interpreting is a very involved process and requires years of experience working closely with the community.