Title

Sandy Peas: Can Pisum sativum Survive in Sandy Soil

Date

5-31-2018 1:00 PM

End Time

31-5-2018 3:00 PM

Location

WUC Summit

Session Chair

Jeff Snyder

Session Title

Biology posters

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ava Howard

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

As the world population continues to grow, we continue to expand the agricultural lands. Crops are needing to be grown in harsher environments than the ideal farmlands. Knowing what stressors a species can deal with and what will definitely destroy it can help farmers get more successful harvests in imperfect conditions. This experiment aimed to test the resilience of pea plants (Pisum sativum) in sandy soil. I hypothesized that if plants need nutrients to grow and maintain organs, then the lack of nutrients will inhibit growth by shorter height, lower leaf count, and more necrosis of leaves. Over the course of 6 weeks, I measured growth, gas exchange, and leaf anatomical traits to see if there was a significant difference between the treatment and control plants. I found that Pisum sativum can tolerate some sandy soil although, it does cause the plants to be smaller and flower earlier than the controls. If a farmer has a sand-soil environment, is looking to have an earlier harvest, or wants smaller plants to conserve water, these pea plants will hold up to the job.

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May 31st, 1:00 PM May 31st, 3:00 PM

Sandy Peas: Can Pisum sativum Survive in Sandy Soil

WUC Summit

As the world population continues to grow, we continue to expand the agricultural lands. Crops are needing to be grown in harsher environments than the ideal farmlands. Knowing what stressors a species can deal with and what will definitely destroy it can help farmers get more successful harvests in imperfect conditions. This experiment aimed to test the resilience of pea plants (Pisum sativum) in sandy soil. I hypothesized that if plants need nutrients to grow and maintain organs, then the lack of nutrients will inhibit growth by shorter height, lower leaf count, and more necrosis of leaves. Over the course of 6 weeks, I measured growth, gas exchange, and leaf anatomical traits to see if there was a significant difference between the treatment and control plants. I found that Pisum sativum can tolerate some sandy soil although, it does cause the plants to be smaller and flower earlier than the controls. If a farmer has a sand-soil environment, is looking to have an earlier harvest, or wants smaller plants to conserve water, these pea plants will hold up to the job.