Title

The Effects Of Larval Population Density And Social Interactions On Adult Fecundity In Drosophila melanogaster

Date

5-31-2018 1:00 PM

End Time

31-5-2018 3:00 PM

Location

WUC Summit

Session Chair

Jeff Snyder

Session Title

Biology posters

Presentation Type

Poster session

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kristin Latham-Scott, Michael Baltzley

Abstract

Drosophila melanogaster are a model organism for studying sexual and mating behaviors. Previous research has suggested that raising flies in isolation effects development of olfactory and visual systems. Our experiment set out to see if density and social interactions as larvae had an effect on fecundity in adult flies. To test this, we raised larvae in high densities, medium densities, and in isolation, with none of the groups food-limiting. We then set up nine different pairwise crosses of adults (high density female x high density male, medium density female x high density male, etc.). The mating pair was removed after 5 days and measured for size. The offspring were collected, noting patterns of eclosion, and measured for size. Our preliminary data suggests that females raised in a moderate density environment as larvae may be most fecund. We will continue to run these crosses for a total of 10 replicates of each pairwise cross to gather more data for analysis. This research will contribute to the understanding effects of population density and social interactions in fruit flies.

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May 31st, 1:00 PM May 31st, 3:00 PM

The Effects Of Larval Population Density And Social Interactions On Adult Fecundity In Drosophila melanogaster

WUC Summit

Drosophila melanogaster are a model organism for studying sexual and mating behaviors. Previous research has suggested that raising flies in isolation effects development of olfactory and visual systems. Our experiment set out to see if density and social interactions as larvae had an effect on fecundity in adult flies. To test this, we raised larvae in high densities, medium densities, and in isolation, with none of the groups food-limiting. We then set up nine different pairwise crosses of adults (high density female x high density male, medium density female x high density male, etc.). The mating pair was removed after 5 days and measured for size. The offspring were collected, noting patterns of eclosion, and measured for size. Our preliminary data suggests that females raised in a moderate density environment as larvae may be most fecund. We will continue to run these crosses for a total of 10 replicates of each pairwise cross to gather more data for analysis. This research will contribute to the understanding effects of population density and social interactions in fruit flies.