Title

The Effect Video Games Have in Therapy to Treat Ailments in Children and Adolescents

Date

5-31-2018 2:30 PM

End Time

31-5-2018 3:00 PM

Location

HWC 203

Session Chair

Tom Kelly

Session Chair

Jennifer Taylor-Winney

Session Title

Health and Exercise Science Group Presentations

Presentation Type

Presentation

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Amy Hammermeister

Abstract

This paper aims to explain the legitimacy of video games as a viable treatment in children with both physical and mental ailments. Studies conducted aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the Xbox Kinect, Nintendo Wii, ENLAZA interface, as well as some other computerized virtual reality (“VR”) systems in treating children with cerebral palsy, general pain, brain injury, and memory issues affecting adolescents with learning disabilities. Children showed an overall interest in video game treatment over traditional methods of treatment. These methods have been documented as being effective in raising the motivation of children to engage in therapy. Research using unconventional, novel methods had shown benefits in aiding children suffering from these issues; however, studies in this area are still in their infancy.

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May 31st, 2:30 PM May 31st, 3:00 PM

The Effect Video Games Have in Therapy to Treat Ailments in Children and Adolescents

HWC 203

This paper aims to explain the legitimacy of video games as a viable treatment in children with both physical and mental ailments. Studies conducted aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the Xbox Kinect, Nintendo Wii, ENLAZA interface, as well as some other computerized virtual reality (“VR”) systems in treating children with cerebral palsy, general pain, brain injury, and memory issues affecting adolescents with learning disabilities. Children showed an overall interest in video game treatment over traditional methods of treatment. These methods have been documented as being effective in raising the motivation of children to engage in therapy. Research using unconventional, novel methods had shown benefits in aiding children suffering from these issues; however, studies in this area are still in their infancy.