Title

Video Gaming, Social Relationships, and Gender

Date

5-31-2018 9:30 AM

End Time

31-5-2018 10:00 AM

Location

RWEC 101

Session Chair

Dean Braa

Session Title

Research and Praxis in Sociology

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Peter Callero

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

This research explores the ability of massive multiplayer online (MMOs) video games to act as a space for social interaction and examines a possible relationship between gender identity and MMO video games. I analyzed survey data from students at Western Oregon University in the 2017-2018 year; totaling a sample of 234 surveys. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with ten people who play MMO video games. I found that individuals do form relationships via social interaction in MMO video games; some relationships that developed transcended the online space to the physical world and many were enduring in nature. I also found that gender had an impact on the likelihood of playing MMO video games – men were more active than women. The results support previous research regarding gender differences as well and evidence suggesting that video games can act as spaces for social activity. Future research may want to explore the strength and specificity of bonds between individuals within video games and the impact of gender on ones’ experience with social gaming.

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May 31st, 9:30 AM May 31st, 10:00 AM

Video Gaming, Social Relationships, and Gender

RWEC 101

This research explores the ability of massive multiplayer online (MMOs) video games to act as a space for social interaction and examines a possible relationship between gender identity and MMO video games. I analyzed survey data from students at Western Oregon University in the 2017-2018 year; totaling a sample of 234 surveys. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with ten people who play MMO video games. I found that individuals do form relationships via social interaction in MMO video games; some relationships that developed transcended the online space to the physical world and many were enduring in nature. I also found that gender had an impact on the likelihood of playing MMO video games – men were more active than women. The results support previous research regarding gender differences as well and evidence suggesting that video games can act as spaces for social activity. Future research may want to explore the strength and specificity of bonds between individuals within video games and the impact of gender on ones’ experience with social gaming.