Title

Jacek Kuron: An Activist of Solidarity’s Future

Date

5-31-2018 2:15 PM

End Time

31-5-2018 2:30 PM

Location

WUC Columbia Room

Session Chair

Kimberly Jensen

Session Title

History Department Senior Capstone Presentations

Faculty Sponsor(s)

David Doellinger, Bau-Hwa Hsieh

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

In 1980, Solidarity became the first independent trade union in communist Poland. As an opposition movement in the 1980s, Solidarity promoted the rights of Polish citizens and contributed to the end of communism in 1989. The work of Jacek Kuron laid the foundation for Solidarity to achieve their success and the introduction of democracy. Jacek Kuron started his activist career in graduate school where he released an “Open Letter to the Party” in 1967. In the letter Kuron accused party officials that they are not following a true communist agenda. Kuron’s activism later led to the creation of Workers Defense Committee (1976) and eventually to Solidarity (1980). Many scholarly accounts of Solidarity mention Kuron briefly with accounts of him being an influential part of Solidarity and how he was an advisor for the group that used his experiences to direct how things needed to be done even from prison. This project focuses on the oppositional activities of Kuron whose moderate stance guided Solidarity along a path that was not radical enough to have a desire to destroy the Party-State but not subservient to the State either.

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May 31st, 2:15 PM May 31st, 2:30 PM

Jacek Kuron: An Activist of Solidarity’s Future

WUC Columbia Room

In 1980, Solidarity became the first independent trade union in communist Poland. As an opposition movement in the 1980s, Solidarity promoted the rights of Polish citizens and contributed to the end of communism in 1989. The work of Jacek Kuron laid the foundation for Solidarity to achieve their success and the introduction of democracy. Jacek Kuron started his activist career in graduate school where he released an “Open Letter to the Party” in 1967. In the letter Kuron accused party officials that they are not following a true communist agenda. Kuron’s activism later led to the creation of Workers Defense Committee (1976) and eventually to Solidarity (1980). Many scholarly accounts of Solidarity mention Kuron briefly with accounts of him being an influential part of Solidarity and how he was an advisor for the group that used his experiences to direct how things needed to be done even from prison. This project focuses on the oppositional activities of Kuron whose moderate stance guided Solidarity along a path that was not radical enough to have a desire to destroy the Party-State but not subservient to the State either.