Title

The Electrifying Power of Knowledge

Date

5-31-2018 9:30 AM

End Time

31-5-2018 9:45 AM

Location

NS 101

Session Chair

Philip Wade

Session Chair

Arlene Courtney

Session Title

Scientific Storytelling using Student Created Videos: Energy Resources Powering our Future

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Philip Wade, Arlene Courtney

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

In 2014, it was recorded that the United States was, on average, consuming electricity at 12,986.74kWh per capita, whereas the rest of the world fell to 3,128.4kWh per capita. With the United States such a large consumer of electricity, it is vital to see where this energy comes from and how it is being used. The United States depends mostly on fossil fuels to create the electricity needed, using coal, natural gas, and petroleum, as well as some renewable resources for creation and distribution across the country. This means it is not a completely clean energy source that can always be relied upon. A vital portion of understanding electricity is learning the history that surrounds it, how it was created, how it is used today, and how it is projected to be used in the future. This documentary will examine the ways in which electricity is created and brought from the factory to consumers, the inner workings of generators, and the development of circuits. Also addressed is the potential ways to limit waste of electricity, and the ways in which the production will increase and adapt in a world that continually moves forward.

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May 31st, 9:30 AM May 31st, 9:45 AM

The Electrifying Power of Knowledge

NS 101

In 2014, it was recorded that the United States was, on average, consuming electricity at 12,986.74kWh per capita, whereas the rest of the world fell to 3,128.4kWh per capita. With the United States such a large consumer of electricity, it is vital to see where this energy comes from and how it is being used. The United States depends mostly on fossil fuels to create the electricity needed, using coal, natural gas, and petroleum, as well as some renewable resources for creation and distribution across the country. This means it is not a completely clean energy source that can always be relied upon. A vital portion of understanding electricity is learning the history that surrounds it, how it was created, how it is used today, and how it is projected to be used in the future. This documentary will examine the ways in which electricity is created and brought from the factory to consumers, the inner workings of generators, and the development of circuits. Also addressed is the potential ways to limit waste of electricity, and the ways in which the production will increase and adapt in a world that continually moves forward.