Title

Types of Electricity: AC vs DC

Date

5-31-2018 9:00 AM

End Time

31-5-2018 9:15 AM

Location

NS 101

Session Chair

Philip Wade

Session Chair

Arlene Courtney

Session Title

Scientific Storytelling using Student Created Videos: Energy Resources Powering our Future

Presentation Type

Presentation

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Philip Wade, Arlene Courtney

Abstract

Since the 1880s, two types of electrical currents have been utilized: alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC). Direct current, discovered by Thomas Edison, gained a competitor when Nikola Tesla discovered alternating current in 1884. Electricity is merely the movement of electrons through a conductor, such as a wire. The difference between alternating and direct current lies in the direction electrons flow; in DC the electrons flow in a single direction, while in AC electrons change direction periodically. The debate of which current to use spurs from the advantages and disadvantages of each. Considering the differences of power transmission, trade-offs, wire diameter, and grid synchronization, DC offers a better alternative. AC was more favorable at the time of its discovery because the cheap costs of its usage, and easy household conversion, though it does pose bigger safety hazards. DC can now be converted so that it does not lose as much energy from power lines to appliances. With that in mind, converted direct current is still more expensive to use than alternating current, but as the result of modern technology DC is becoming the more favorable form of electricity.

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May 31st, 9:00 AM May 31st, 9:15 AM

Types of Electricity: AC vs DC

NS 101

Since the 1880s, two types of electrical currents have been utilized: alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC). Direct current, discovered by Thomas Edison, gained a competitor when Nikola Tesla discovered alternating current in 1884. Electricity is merely the movement of electrons through a conductor, such as a wire. The difference between alternating and direct current lies in the direction electrons flow; in DC the electrons flow in a single direction, while in AC electrons change direction periodically. The debate of which current to use spurs from the advantages and disadvantages of each. Considering the differences of power transmission, trade-offs, wire diameter, and grid synchronization, DC offers a better alternative. AC was more favorable at the time of its discovery because the cheap costs of its usage, and easy household conversion, though it does pose bigger safety hazards. DC can now be converted so that it does not lose as much energy from power lines to appliances. With that in mind, converted direct current is still more expensive to use than alternating current, but as the result of modern technology DC is becoming the more favorable form of electricity.