Title

Running Parachute Analysis

Date

5-31-2018 8:00 AM

End Time

31-5-2018 10:00 AM

Location

WUC Summit Room

Session Chair

Tom Kelly

Session Chair

Jennifer Taylor-Winney

Session Title

Health and Exercise Science poster Session

Presentation Type

Poster session

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Brian Caster

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if the running parachute would apply enough resistance to the subject to increase acceleration and muscle endurance. To determine this, the parachute was connected to a ten-pound medicine ball and dropped from twenty-four feet, while being video taped in slow motion. A rope that was marked every half-meter placed against the wall where the ball was dropped. The ball was dropped twice, once by it’s self and then once with the parachute connected to it. The overall average velocity of the ball dropping without the parachute was 4.99 m/s and average velocity with the parachute was 3.6 m/s. The acceleration for the both the ball by it’s self and with the parachute had steady inclines; the parachute slowed the acceleration down a bit more. Due to the results the parachute applies a small amount of resistance on a runner, not enough to show a significant difference. Future research could be done on running forms and joint angles when training with a running parachute.

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May 31st, 8:00 AM May 31st, 10:00 AM

Running Parachute Analysis

WUC Summit Room

The purpose of this study was to determine if the running parachute would apply enough resistance to the subject to increase acceleration and muscle endurance. To determine this, the parachute was connected to a ten-pound medicine ball and dropped from twenty-four feet, while being video taped in slow motion. A rope that was marked every half-meter placed against the wall where the ball was dropped. The ball was dropped twice, once by it’s self and then once with the parachute connected to it. The overall average velocity of the ball dropping without the parachute was 4.99 m/s and average velocity with the parachute was 3.6 m/s. The acceleration for the both the ball by it’s self and with the parachute had steady inclines; the parachute slowed the acceleration down a bit more. Due to the results the parachute applies a small amount of resistance on a runner, not enough to show a significant difference. Future research could be done on running forms and joint angles when training with a running parachute.