Title

Comparing Leg Press Machines to a Traditional Squat

Date

5-31-2018 8:00 AM

End Time

31-5-2018 10:00 AM

Location

WUC Summit Room

Session Chair

Tom Kelly

Session Chair

Jennifer Taylor-Winney

Session Title

Health and Exercise Science poster Session

Presentation Type

Poster session

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Brian Caster

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to compare leg press machines to a traditional squat in relation to joint angles, range of motion, as well as how each may translate to the “real world”. For this comparison, four Western Oregon University students ages 20-25 were used. In each participants trials, they achieved greater range of motion at the knee while performing a squat than by using either of the two machines. One cause is the position one must sit to use a leg press; the knees meet the chest as the seating position put each of the participants in an average of 90.66 degree flexion at the hip. This resulted in the participant's knees meeting their chest causing a greatly decreased range of motion. In response to this, the participants naturally spread their knees outward, compromising proper joint alignment. The results here suggest that machine based exercises do not offer a complete approach to fitness. It is the opinion of the author that machine based exercises should be limited to those who are in some way compromised. Given that the leg press removes the need to stabilize the limbs or the weight, those who suffer from an injury or another form of inability would benefit.

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May 31st, 8:00 AM May 31st, 10:00 AM

Comparing Leg Press Machines to a Traditional Squat

WUC Summit Room

The purpose of this study is to compare leg press machines to a traditional squat in relation to joint angles, range of motion, as well as how each may translate to the “real world”. For this comparison, four Western Oregon University students ages 20-25 were used. In each participants trials, they achieved greater range of motion at the knee while performing a squat than by using either of the two machines. One cause is the position one must sit to use a leg press; the knees meet the chest as the seating position put each of the participants in an average of 90.66 degree flexion at the hip. This resulted in the participant's knees meeting their chest causing a greatly decreased range of motion. In response to this, the participants naturally spread their knees outward, compromising proper joint alignment. The results here suggest that machine based exercises do not offer a complete approach to fitness. It is the opinion of the author that machine based exercises should be limited to those who are in some way compromised. Given that the leg press removes the need to stabilize the limbs or the weight, those who suffer from an injury or another form of inability would benefit.