Title

Stability of the ankle: Does wearing an ankle brace change ankle stability and balance scores?

Date

5-31-2018 8:00 AM

End Time

31-5-2018 10:00 AM

Location

WUC Summit Room

Session Chair

Tom Kelly

Session Chair

Jennifer Taylor-Winney

Session Title

Health and Exercise Science poster Session

Presentation Type

Poster session

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Brian Caster

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of both perceived and measured stability and balance on the Biodex while using different bracing mechanisms. Methods: Six Western Oregon University volunteer participants took part in the study. All participants were females with no surgical or current injury to their tested ankle. Procedure: All testing was done barefooted, in each of the three different conditions (no brace, soft brace, stiff brace) procedures were the same. Each session began with active range of motion (ROM) assessment that was collected by capturing video. Once ROM was collected the participant moved onto the Biodex to perform the athletic single leg stability testing then participants filled out a survey to assess their perceived stability. Results: ROM for each individual participant stayed consistent there was little/no change among the different measurements. Overall findings of this study showed that the use of an ankle brace does not have a large impact on stability or ROM for a majority of the participants. Although actual ankle stability does not change, the use of an ankle brace can increase the perceived stability during performance.

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May 31st, 8:00 AM May 31st, 10:00 AM

Stability of the ankle: Does wearing an ankle brace change ankle stability and balance scores?

WUC Summit Room

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of both perceived and measured stability and balance on the Biodex while using different bracing mechanisms. Methods: Six Western Oregon University volunteer participants took part in the study. All participants were females with no surgical or current injury to their tested ankle. Procedure: All testing was done barefooted, in each of the three different conditions (no brace, soft brace, stiff brace) procedures were the same. Each session began with active range of motion (ROM) assessment that was collected by capturing video. Once ROM was collected the participant moved onto the Biodex to perform the athletic single leg stability testing then participants filled out a survey to assess their perceived stability. Results: ROM for each individual participant stayed consistent there was little/no change among the different measurements. Overall findings of this study showed that the use of an ankle brace does not have a large impact on stability or ROM for a majority of the participants. Although actual ankle stability does not change, the use of an ankle brace can increase the perceived stability during performance.