Title

Blindfolded for Science: an Integration of Dance as Therapy for Visually Impaired or Blind Individuals

Date

5-31-2018 9:00 AM

End Time

31-5-2018 9:15 AM

Location

HWC 205

Session Chair

AES Team

Session Title

Multidisciplinary presentation Session

Presentation Type

Presentation

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Karen Haberman

Abstract

Sight is used by our brain as a connecting bridge between other sensory input and stimuli from the world. Since humans are visual creatures, we heavily rely on vision to interact with our environments. Because of this role, impaired vision can diminish a person's confidence in movement and can introduce a fear of falling. Previous research suggests that these limitations can be overcome through the use of Dance/Movement Therapy, a form of psychological therapy. Although it has been beneficial to the mental health of participants in the American Dance Therapy Association, the physical effects that dance can have on the human body when visually impaired are not as thoroughly examined. This project investigated the sport of dance and compared the effects that vision state and dance experience had on orientation and posture. Students with minimal dance experience were compared to students with extensive dance experience both before and after one month of blindfolded dance training. They were also compared to students with minimal dance experience who were sighted during the dance training.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 31st, 9:00 AM May 31st, 9:15 AM

Blindfolded for Science: an Integration of Dance as Therapy for Visually Impaired or Blind Individuals

HWC 205

Sight is used by our brain as a connecting bridge between other sensory input and stimuli from the world. Since humans are visual creatures, we heavily rely on vision to interact with our environments. Because of this role, impaired vision can diminish a person's confidence in movement and can introduce a fear of falling. Previous research suggests that these limitations can be overcome through the use of Dance/Movement Therapy, a form of psychological therapy. Although it has been beneficial to the mental health of participants in the American Dance Therapy Association, the physical effects that dance can have on the human body when visually impaired are not as thoroughly examined. This project investigated the sport of dance and compared the effects that vision state and dance experience had on orientation and posture. Students with minimal dance experience were compared to students with extensive dance experience both before and after one month of blindfolded dance training. They were also compared to students with minimal dance experience who were sighted during the dance training.