Faculty Seminar Advisor

Dr. David Doellinger

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts

Department

History

Document Type

Paper

Publication Date

Spring 2014

Abstract

The Coos Bay region on the southern Oregon coast has long been known for its rural landscape, pitting a lush river valley against a backdrop of old growth forests that have proved to be a lucrative enterprise for those interested and daring enough to harvest them.1 Beyond its abundance of rich resources, the region is also situated on the deepest natural harbor on the Oregon coast, making it a prime location for the exportation of its valuable natural resources. This modest timber region grew from its humble origins as a shelter for the castaway sailors of the military ship Captain Lincoln2 to its coming of age at the end of World War II as the purported “lumber capital of the world.” In between this nearly hundred year period (1851-1946) the Coos Bay region experienced the pains of being blessed with abundant natural resources, in addition to succumbing to the corporate capitalist greed that surrounded and exploited every thriving timber village that aspired to be more than simply the dependents of profit-hungry investors.

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