Publication Date

6-1-2009

Abstract

The article examines how the depiction of American suburbia in motion pictures illustrates the physical, cultural, and demographic changes in modern suburban society. Particular attention is paid to the portrayal of the suburban landscape in the 1999 film "Office Space," written and directed by Mike Judge. The "polymorphous" landscape of "Office Space" shows single family homes along side office parks, apartments, restaurants and retail spaces. How the film introduces new sources of angst and oppression to contemporary suburbia is assessed. It is suggested that the film highlights the fact that the suburbs Americans actually live in are fundamentally different from the ones that once dominated the cultural imagination.

Publisher

Wiley

Journal

Journal of Popular Culture

Volume Number

42

Issue Number

3

First Page Number

497

Last Page Number

514

Identifier

10.1111/j.1540-5931.2009.00692.x

Type

Article

Department

Geography

Comments

NOTICE: Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version of this document can be found online at Journal of Popular Culture, published by Wiley Blackwell. Copyright restrictions may apply. DOI: 10.1111/j.1540-5931.2009.00692.x

Rights

In Copyright (InC)

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