Publication Date

3-2016

Abstract

Natural environments vary in the degree to which humans have altered them; some environments, like wilderness areas, are relatively untouched, while others, like urban green spaces, are heavily manicured. The current research examined the effect of human-induced alteration to natural environments on perceived naturalness and environmental preferences in a student sample (Study 1) and a sample of nonstudent adults (Study 2). It was predicted that a human-altered natural environment would be viewed as less natural than a non-altered natural environment. It was also predicted that a human-altered natural environment would be viewed more negatively than a non-altered natural environment. Results largely supported these predictions. Human-altered natural environments were viewed as less natural than non-altered natural environments, and across several indicators of environmental preference, participants responded more negatively to human-altered natural environments than non-altered natural environments. Perceived naturalness mediated the effect of human-induced alteration on each environmental preference variable, suggesting that non-altered environments are preferred because they are viewed as more natural than their human-altered counterparts. These findings are consistent with an evolutionary account of non-altered natural environments offering more benefits and entailing fewer costs than human-altered natural environments. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract)

Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert

Journal

Ecopsychology

Volume Number

8

Issue Number

1

First Page Number

54

Last Page Number

63

DOI

10.1089/eco.2015.0068

Type

Article

Department

Psychology

Comments

Final publication is available from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/eco.2015.0068

Rights

In Copyright (InC)

Included in

Psychology Commons

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