Publication Date

7-2-2007

Abstract

We performed three experiments to examine the effects of repeated study–judgement–test sessions on metacognitive monitoring, and to see if better students (those with higher Scholastic Aptitude Test or SAT scores) outperform low SAT students. In all experiments, mean metacognitive accuracy (bias scores and Gamma correlations) did improve with practice. Most improvement involved students’ ability to predict which items would not be recalled later. In addition, students with high SAT scores recalled more items, were less overconfident, and adjusted their predictions more effectively. Thus, high SAT students may be able to adjust their metacognitive monitoring effectively without feedback, but low SAT students appear unlikely to do so. Educators may need to devise more explicit techniques to help low SAT students improve their metacognitive monitoring during the course of a semester.

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Type (DCMI Terms)

Text

Journal

European Journal of Cognitive Psychology

Volume Number

19

Issue Number

4-5

First Page Number

689

Last Page Number

717

Identifier

10.1080/09541440701326170

Type

Article

Department

Psychology

Rights

In Copyright (In-C)

Included in

Psychology Commons

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