Title

Obtainable Chemical Products and Forensic Taphonomy

Date

6-1-2017 11:00 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 1:00 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Criminal Justice

Session Chair

Misty Weitzel

Session Title

Forensic Anthropology

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Misty Weitzel

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

This case report examines the taphonomic effects of ten different chemical products (lime, chlorine bleach, landscape fertilizer, burned and unburned gasoline, ammonia, dry ice, methanol, sulfuric acid, cement, and insecticide) reported in law enforcement literature with the deposition of human remains. The eight-week experiment incorporates portions of defleshed cow femura placed into ten separate one-foot deep by one-foot wide burial sites. In each of the sites, one chemical was introduced to a cow femur and covered with the natural soil. One separate burial site with a femur but without a chemical was utilized in the experiment for comparison purposes. To determine the taphonomic effects during the eight-weeks, each cow femur was photographed, and its weight, color, and morphological characteristics were recorded. The movement and observed disturbance to the soil prior to and after the eight-weeks was also recorded. The objective of this experiment is to determine the taphonomic effects of various chemicals on the soil and bone in each of the burial sites.

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Jun 1st, 11:00 AM Jun 1st, 1:00 PM

Obtainable Chemical Products and Forensic Taphonomy

WUC Pacific Room

This case report examines the taphonomic effects of ten different chemical products (lime, chlorine bleach, landscape fertilizer, burned and unburned gasoline, ammonia, dry ice, methanol, sulfuric acid, cement, and insecticide) reported in law enforcement literature with the deposition of human remains. The eight-week experiment incorporates portions of defleshed cow femura placed into ten separate one-foot deep by one-foot wide burial sites. In each of the sites, one chemical was introduced to a cow femur and covered with the natural soil. One separate burial site with a femur but without a chemical was utilized in the experiment for comparison purposes. To determine the taphonomic effects during the eight-weeks, each cow femur was photographed, and its weight, color, and morphological characteristics were recorded. The movement and observed disturbance to the soil prior to and after the eight-weeks was also recorded. The objective of this experiment is to determine the taphonomic effects of various chemicals on the soil and bone in each of the burial sites.