Title

The White Rose’s Resistance to Nazism: The Influence of Friedrich Nietzsche

Date

6-1-2017 10:45 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 11:00 AM

Location

WUC Columbia Room

Department

History

Session Chair

Elizabeth M. Swedo

Session Title

History Senior Thesis presentations

Faculty Sponsor(s)

David Doellinger

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The White Rose was a non-violent resistance organization, founded by students in Munich during the Second World War. Many scholars argue that Christian morals and other Christian leaders influenced the group the most, but an analysis of their leaflets and correspondences highlights the influence the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche had on the organization. By reading and discussing Nietzsche, members of the White Rose, particularly Hans and Sophie Scholl, derived and solidified their commitment to opposing Nazism, including their belief that Germans could no longer ignore the crimes of the Nazi State. From 1942 to 1943, the White Rose anonymously distributed leaflets in Germany in an attempt to reach out to the German people and open their eyes to Nazi atrocities. Written in 1943, the “Leaflet of Resistance” is their most important leaflet because it represents the organization’s most aggressive expression of resistance toward Nazism. During the distribution of this leaflet, Hans and Sophie Scholl took additional risks that led to their arrest, trial, and execution.

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Jun 1st, 10:45 AM Jun 1st, 11:00 AM

The White Rose’s Resistance to Nazism: The Influence of Friedrich Nietzsche

WUC Columbia Room

The White Rose was a non-violent resistance organization, founded by students in Munich during the Second World War. Many scholars argue that Christian morals and other Christian leaders influenced the group the most, but an analysis of their leaflets and correspondences highlights the influence the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche had on the organization. By reading and discussing Nietzsche, members of the White Rose, particularly Hans and Sophie Scholl, derived and solidified their commitment to opposing Nazism, including their belief that Germans could no longer ignore the crimes of the Nazi State. From 1942 to 1943, the White Rose anonymously distributed leaflets in Germany in an attempt to reach out to the German people and open their eyes to Nazi atrocities. Written in 1943, the “Leaflet of Resistance” is their most important leaflet because it represents the organization’s most aggressive expression of resistance toward Nazism. During the distribution of this leaflet, Hans and Sophie Scholl took additional risks that led to their arrest, trial, and execution.