Title

Reforming the Sacred: Controlling Church Space in Laudian England (1625-1641)

Date

6-1-2017 10:15 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 10:30 AM

Location

WUC Columbia Room

Department

History

Session Chair

Elizabeth M. Swedo

Session Title

History Senior Thesis presentations

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Elizabeth Swedo

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The break from the Catholic Church and the formation of the Anglican Church of England in 1547 resulted in a tumultuous eighty-year period of redefining church doctrine. Recognizing in the 1620s that the Church of England still lacked cohesion and sound doctrine, King Charles I and Archbishop William Laud sought to bring the diverse ideas and sects of Christianity together under one unified church. Though historians have touched upon the concept of sacred space during this period, I argue that these attempts at unification and clarification of the church’s beliefs drew upon many different factors, especially controlling sacred space. Archbishop Laud’s injunction for the Chichester diocese in 1635 demonstrates the three ways sacred space was regulated through the manipulation of physical space, soundscape and theological understanding. From dogwhipping to silence unruly dogs during services, to railing altars in order to separate the holy clergy from the unholy laity as a means of creating layers of sacredness, the Church sought to standardize sacred space.

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Jun 1st, 10:15 AM Jun 1st, 10:30 AM

Reforming the Sacred: Controlling Church Space in Laudian England (1625-1641)

WUC Columbia Room

The break from the Catholic Church and the formation of the Anglican Church of England in 1547 resulted in a tumultuous eighty-year period of redefining church doctrine. Recognizing in the 1620s that the Church of England still lacked cohesion and sound doctrine, King Charles I and Archbishop William Laud sought to bring the diverse ideas and sects of Christianity together under one unified church. Though historians have touched upon the concept of sacred space during this period, I argue that these attempts at unification and clarification of the church’s beliefs drew upon many different factors, especially controlling sacred space. Archbishop Laud’s injunction for the Chichester diocese in 1635 demonstrates the three ways sacred space was regulated through the manipulation of physical space, soundscape and theological understanding. From dogwhipping to silence unruly dogs during services, to railing altars in order to separate the holy clergy from the unholy laity as a means of creating layers of sacredness, the Church sought to standardize sacred space.