Title

God and Revolution: Religion and Power from Pre-revolutionary France to the Napoleonic Empire

Date

6-1-2017 9:30 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 9:45 AM

Location

WUC Columbia Room

Department

History

Session Chair

Elizabeth M. Swedo

Session Title

History Senior Thesis presentations

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Patricia Goldsworthy-Bishop

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

With the occurrence of the French Revolution in 1789, Catholicism was replaced by secularized religion. Maximilien Robespierre, a French revolutionary and politician, was a key figure in the transition into secularized religion that followed revolutionary politics. Robespierre’s creation of an edict for the establishment of the “Cult of the Supreme Being,” a secularized religion, created a new form of using political power through religion. This new religion took traditional Catholic structures, such as ceremonies and festivals, as a form of political propaganda and power. This presentation on Robespierre’s “Decree on the Supreme Being” (1794) argues that this new form of national religion still maintained some critical aspects of traditional Catholicism.

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Jun 1st, 9:30 AM Jun 1st, 9:45 AM

God and Revolution: Religion and Power from Pre-revolutionary France to the Napoleonic Empire

WUC Columbia Room

With the occurrence of the French Revolution in 1789, Catholicism was replaced by secularized religion. Maximilien Robespierre, a French revolutionary and politician, was a key figure in the transition into secularized religion that followed revolutionary politics. Robespierre’s creation of an edict for the establishment of the “Cult of the Supreme Being,” a secularized religion, created a new form of using political power through religion. This new religion took traditional Catholic structures, such as ceremonies and festivals, as a form of political propaganda and power. This presentation on Robespierre’s “Decree on the Supreme Being” (1794) argues that this new form of national religion still maintained some critical aspects of traditional Catholicism.