Title

Oral Histories, Women, and Sport in Late Twentieth Century America

Date

6-1-2017 9:15 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 9:30 AM

Location

WUC Columbia Room

Department

History

Session Chair

Elizabeth M. Swedo

Session Title

History Senior Thesis presentations

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kimberly Jensen

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

To explore women’s access to institutionalized sports spaces in the mid/late twentieth century, I have analyzed four oral history interviews. Oral histories exhibit directly and personally the ways in which American society has regulated women’s access to public space and how some women attempted to surpass the expectations placed upon them. The hour-long interview I conducted in March 2017 with Linda Stonecipher, an athlete and coach in the late twentieth century, is indicative of the difficulties female athletes have faced. Her oral history exhibits some of the ways in which women have been systematically held from athletic spaces due to their gender; she assisted in starting her high school female basketball team (which previously had not existed), and her college had two separate P.E. degree programs which were gender segregated. Stonecipher’s gender defined the sports to which she had access, the support from her communities, and the limitations she faced as a coach and athlete. My unique oral histories add to the current research in adding more voices and stories to the larger discussion of women in sport and public space, both popular scholarly discussions today.

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Jun 1st, 9:15 AM Jun 1st, 9:30 AM

Oral Histories, Women, and Sport in Late Twentieth Century America

WUC Columbia Room

To explore women’s access to institutionalized sports spaces in the mid/late twentieth century, I have analyzed four oral history interviews. Oral histories exhibit directly and personally the ways in which American society has regulated women’s access to public space and how some women attempted to surpass the expectations placed upon them. The hour-long interview I conducted in March 2017 with Linda Stonecipher, an athlete and coach in the late twentieth century, is indicative of the difficulties female athletes have faced. Her oral history exhibits some of the ways in which women have been systematically held from athletic spaces due to their gender; she assisted in starting her high school female basketball team (which previously had not existed), and her college had two separate P.E. degree programs which were gender segregated. Stonecipher’s gender defined the sports to which she had access, the support from her communities, and the limitations she faced as a coach and athlete. My unique oral histories add to the current research in adding more voices and stories to the larger discussion of women in sport and public space, both popular scholarly discussions today.