Title

Violence in Algeria: From Colonization to Independent Nation

Date

6-1-2017 8:30 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 8:45 AM

Location

WUC Columbia Room

Department

History

Session Chair

Elizabeth M. Swedo

Session Title

History Senior Thesis presentations

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Patricia Goldsworthy-Bishop

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Starting in 1954 and lasting until 1962 the French-Algerian War was one of the bloodiest struggles of decolonization in French history. In his book The Wretched of the Earth (1961), Frantz Fanon presents an explanation on the violence and social injustice he witnessed while in Algeria. Fanon was a Martinique born psychiatrist who originally was hired by the French military, but quit and joined the revolution when he saw the effects of colonization on the Algerians. Fanon demonstrates how the French placed the Algerians at the bottom of the social hierarchy, denied the native population proper rights and murdered an immense number Algerians. The lack of social status given to the native Algerians built up anger, which Fanon explains transformed into hatred for the French. Fanon argues that the Algerians would have to take their hatred of the French and turn it into mass amounts of violence for decolonization. The insights in Fanon's book fits the pattern of violence identified in the larger research project, which argues that complete decolonization could only be achieved through increased violence. A violent decolonization was the only way the “last could become the first.”

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Jun 1st, 8:30 AM Jun 1st, 8:45 AM

Violence in Algeria: From Colonization to Independent Nation

WUC Columbia Room

Starting in 1954 and lasting until 1962 the French-Algerian War was one of the bloodiest struggles of decolonization in French history. In his book The Wretched of the Earth (1961), Frantz Fanon presents an explanation on the violence and social injustice he witnessed while in Algeria. Fanon was a Martinique born psychiatrist who originally was hired by the French military, but quit and joined the revolution when he saw the effects of colonization on the Algerians. Fanon demonstrates how the French placed the Algerians at the bottom of the social hierarchy, denied the native population proper rights and murdered an immense number Algerians. The lack of social status given to the native Algerians built up anger, which Fanon explains transformed into hatred for the French. Fanon argues that the Algerians would have to take their hatred of the French and turn it into mass amounts of violence for decolonization. The insights in Fanon's book fits the pattern of violence identified in the larger research project, which argues that complete decolonization could only be achieved through increased violence. A violent decolonization was the only way the “last could become the first.”