Title

The Effects of Work-Family-School Balance on Non-Traditional Student Affect

Date

6-1-2017 11:00 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 11:15 AM

Location

WUC Calapooia Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

Jaime Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences Symposium

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Debi Brannan

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to gain a greater understanding of the daily demands that students experience and further examine the effects of those experiences on daily moods. Both work and educational demands were examined in terms of nervousness, loneliness, distress, and fearfulness. This study was conducted using mixed methodology. Specifically, participants filled out an initial assessment along with a daily diary consisting of a brief survey for 21 days. Fifty-three non-traditional students, enrolled at least part-time, living with a significant other, and at least 21 years of age, participated in the study. Results showed that as school demands increased so did distressed, scared and nervous moods. Increased work demands correlated with increased nervousness and loneliness. These results were thought to be related to role strain and a lack of feeling understood or supported at work. As this study was the first of its kind, it was groundwork for further research in the area of non-traditional student demands, stressors, and the role of potential social support to alleviate some of these pressures.

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Jun 1st, 11:00 AM Jun 1st, 11:15 AM

The Effects of Work-Family-School Balance on Non-Traditional Student Affect

WUC Calapooia Room

The purpose of the current study was to gain a greater understanding of the daily demands that students experience and further examine the effects of those experiences on daily moods. Both work and educational demands were examined in terms of nervousness, loneliness, distress, and fearfulness. This study was conducted using mixed methodology. Specifically, participants filled out an initial assessment along with a daily diary consisting of a brief survey for 21 days. Fifty-three non-traditional students, enrolled at least part-time, living with a significant other, and at least 21 years of age, participated in the study. Results showed that as school demands increased so did distressed, scared and nervous moods. Increased work demands correlated with increased nervousness and loneliness. These results were thought to be related to role strain and a lack of feeling understood or supported at work. As this study was the first of its kind, it was groundwork for further research in the area of non-traditional student demands, stressors, and the role of potential social support to alleviate some of these pressures.