Title

The Personal Impact of Alzheimer's Association's Early Stage Programs

Date

6-1-2017 11:30 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 11:45 AM

Location

WUC Calapooia Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

Jaime Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences Symposium

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Margaret Manoogian

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The Alzheimer’s Association’s Oregon Chapter examined perceptions of their early stage programs as experienced by participants. Prior literature has indicated that both social engagement and artistic activities are valuable in reducing feelings of isolation, shame, and stress for both caregivers and participants with dementia. Dyadic interviews were conducted with 4 participants with dementia and their 4 care partners. The purpose of these interviews was to determine the emotional outcomes of participating in early stage programs from the perspective of both parties. Transcripts were evaluated to identify recurrent themes from the data. Overarching themes included a decrease in isolation experienced by both parties, highly valuing socialization with an understanding group, and a desire to decrease the stigma associated with dementia. Responses from participants and care partners echoed results of prior studies, indicating that involvement in early stage programs may increase quality of life. Results will be valuable in evaluating and developing early stage programs, validating the worth of such interventions, and in addressing stigma surrounding dementia through public education.

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Jun 1st, 11:30 AM Jun 1st, 11:45 AM

The Personal Impact of Alzheimer's Association's Early Stage Programs

WUC Calapooia Room

The Alzheimer’s Association’s Oregon Chapter examined perceptions of their early stage programs as experienced by participants. Prior literature has indicated that both social engagement and artistic activities are valuable in reducing feelings of isolation, shame, and stress for both caregivers and participants with dementia. Dyadic interviews were conducted with 4 participants with dementia and their 4 care partners. The purpose of these interviews was to determine the emotional outcomes of participating in early stage programs from the perspective of both parties. Transcripts were evaluated to identify recurrent themes from the data. Overarching themes included a decrease in isolation experienced by both parties, highly valuing socialization with an understanding group, and a desire to decrease the stigma associated with dementia. Responses from participants and care partners echoed results of prior studies, indicating that involvement in early stage programs may increase quality of life. Results will be valuable in evaluating and developing early stage programs, validating the worth of such interventions, and in addressing stigma surrounding dementia through public education.