Title

The Role of Scrubs and Low-Level Healthcare Certification in White Coat Hypertension

Date

6-1-2017 8:30 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 10:30 AM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

Jaime Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences poster Session

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Joel Alexander

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

White coat hypertension (WCH) is a response where a patient’s blood pressure is increased while in a clinical setting. WCH is usually accounted for as an anxious response to being in the presence of highly-trained, white coat-wearing medical professionals who may make judgements about the patient’s health. However, vital signs, including blood pressure, tend to be taken by medical paraprofessionals who wear scrubs and have significantly less medical training, such as nursing assistants and medical assistants. The purpose of this study was to determine whether scrubs and the knowledge of a paraprofessional’s training can induce WCH. It was predicted that seeing an experimenter in scrubs would induce a more profound hypertensive effect in participants than seeing an experimenter in regular clothes, and that learning of an experimenter's training as a nursing assistant would cause a hypertensive effect that would otherwise be absent when the participant was unaware of said training. Participants had their blood pressure measured twice by an experimenter in either scrubs or regular clothes; the participants were made aware of the experimenter's training prior to the second measurement.

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Jun 1st, 8:30 AM Jun 1st, 10:30 AM

The Role of Scrubs and Low-Level Healthcare Certification in White Coat Hypertension

WUC Pacific Room

White coat hypertension (WCH) is a response where a patient’s blood pressure is increased while in a clinical setting. WCH is usually accounted for as an anxious response to being in the presence of highly-trained, white coat-wearing medical professionals who may make judgements about the patient’s health. However, vital signs, including blood pressure, tend to be taken by medical paraprofessionals who wear scrubs and have significantly less medical training, such as nursing assistants and medical assistants. The purpose of this study was to determine whether scrubs and the knowledge of a paraprofessional’s training can induce WCH. It was predicted that seeing an experimenter in scrubs would induce a more profound hypertensive effect in participants than seeing an experimenter in regular clothes, and that learning of an experimenter's training as a nursing assistant would cause a hypertensive effect that would otherwise be absent when the participant was unaware of said training. Participants had their blood pressure measured twice by an experimenter in either scrubs or regular clothes; the participants were made aware of the experimenter's training prior to the second measurement.