Title

Destruction of or by Nature: Response to Human-Altered Environments

Date

6-1-2017 8:30 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 10:30 AM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

Jaime Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences poster Session

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ethan McMahan

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

A number of scholars from a variety of disciplines have stated that being in nature improves psychological health. To further examine this, we researched whether exposure to human-altered versus nature-altered natural environments impacted participants’ concurrent emotional state and cognitive assessments regarding environmental quality and preference. It was hypothesized that participants would indicate more positive affective responses to the nature-altered environment and view this environment as more valuable than the human-altered environment. Participants were instructed to read a short vignette describing a natural area and then watch a seven minute photographic slideshow of the areas on a head-mounted display. The vignette provided to participants varied, such that half received a vignette describing a nature-altered environment, and half received a vignette describing a human-altered natural environment. Participants then completed a variety of self-reported measures. Results indicated that human alteration did not have significant effects on these measures.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 1st, 8:30 AM Jun 1st, 10:30 AM

Destruction of or by Nature: Response to Human-Altered Environments

WUC Pacific Room

A number of scholars from a variety of disciplines have stated that being in nature improves psychological health. To further examine this, we researched whether exposure to human-altered versus nature-altered natural environments impacted participants’ concurrent emotional state and cognitive assessments regarding environmental quality and preference. It was hypothesized that participants would indicate more positive affective responses to the nature-altered environment and view this environment as more valuable than the human-altered environment. Participants were instructed to read a short vignette describing a natural area and then watch a seven minute photographic slideshow of the areas on a head-mounted display. The vignette provided to participants varied, such that half received a vignette describing a nature-altered environment, and half received a vignette describing a human-altered natural environment. Participants then completed a variety of self-reported measures. Results indicated that human alteration did not have significant effects on these measures.