Title

The Influence of Self-Esteem on the Fading Affect Bias in Autobiographic Memories

Date

6-1-2017 8:30 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 10:30 AM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

Jaime Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences poster Session

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Jaime Cloud

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Previous research suggests that the affect intensity of negative autobiographic memories fades faster than with positive autobiographic memories, and self-esteem potentially influences this fading effect. The current study examined if participants’ self-esteem levels influenced the rate at which the affect intensity of negative memories faded. To examine this, participants were first asked to complete a self-esteem questionnaire. Participants were then asked to recall a particular positive or a particular negative memory, and then score the event based how it made them feel when it occurred and how it made them feel when thinking about the memory. The difference between the scores for affect at occurrence and affect at recall will be calculated. The scores produced will then be compared by memory type and self-esteem level. Implications of the attained findings, design limitations, and future directions will be discussed.

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Jun 1st, 8:30 AM Jun 1st, 10:30 AM

The Influence of Self-Esteem on the Fading Affect Bias in Autobiographic Memories

WUC Pacific Room

Previous research suggests that the affect intensity of negative autobiographic memories fades faster than with positive autobiographic memories, and self-esteem potentially influences this fading effect. The current study examined if participants’ self-esteem levels influenced the rate at which the affect intensity of negative memories faded. To examine this, participants were first asked to complete a self-esteem questionnaire. Participants were then asked to recall a particular positive or a particular negative memory, and then score the event based how it made them feel when it occurred and how it made them feel when thinking about the memory. The difference between the scores for affect at occurrence and affect at recall will be calculated. The scores produced will then be compared by memory type and self-esteem level. Implications of the attained findings, design limitations, and future directions will be discussed.