Title

Solar Eclipses in Ancient Greece

Date

6-1-2017 4:00 PM

End Time

1-6-2017 6:00 PM

Location

WUC Columbia Room

Session Title

Presidential Plenary

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Laurie Burton

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Since the dawn of time, mankind has been awestruck with the beauty of astronomy. Ancient civilizations viewed the sky as the key to unlocking the heavens. Our own sun, the moon and even the stars were viewed as the gods that look upon us from the heavens and bless us with their grace. Ancient Greek societies viewed the sun as a symbol of life, the key to which the living thrived with the moon as its counter. These symbols contributed to many different historical events such as peace treaties and the beginnings of war. But the one event that seemed to stump even the most brilliant of Greek minds was the complete solar eclipse. Years pass since the first witnessed Greek solar eclipse and many scholars are working on unlocking the key to its timeframe. Off the coast of Antikythera (what is now Crete) in the early 1900s, a fishing vessel discovered what is thought of as the world’s first analog computer. What we didn't know is that this device that we call the Antikythera Mechanism was actually the key to unlocking the ancient mathematical formula for the original Saros dial.

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Jun 1st, 4:00 PM Jun 1st, 6:00 PM

Solar Eclipses in Ancient Greece

WUC Columbia Room

Since the dawn of time, mankind has been awestruck with the beauty of astronomy. Ancient civilizations viewed the sky as the key to unlocking the heavens. Our own sun, the moon and even the stars were viewed as the gods that look upon us from the heavens and bless us with their grace. Ancient Greek societies viewed the sun as a symbol of life, the key to which the living thrived with the moon as its counter. These symbols contributed to many different historical events such as peace treaties and the beginnings of war. But the one event that seemed to stump even the most brilliant of Greek minds was the complete solar eclipse. Years pass since the first witnessed Greek solar eclipse and many scholars are working on unlocking the key to its timeframe. Off the coast of Antikythera (what is now Crete) in the early 1900s, a fishing vessel discovered what is thought of as the world’s first analog computer. What we didn't know is that this device that we call the Antikythera Mechanism was actually the key to unlocking the ancient mathematical formula for the original Saros dial.