Title

Indigenous Peoples and Psychotherapy ‘The Soul Wound’

Date

6-1-2017 2:00 PM

End Time

1-6-2017 2:15 PM

Location

RWEC 101

Department

Deaf Studies and Professional Studies

Session Chair

Erin Trine

Session Chair

Vicki

Session Title

Deaf Studies and Professional Studies

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Denise Thew

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

This project is intended to challenge us to use creativity in addressing the diversity context of the vocational rehabilitation field. Grasping the history of any oppressed person is critical for counselors to develop when working with clients who are members of an oppressed population. This presentation will discuss the Native American population, briefly address ‘The Soul Wound’, and how these historical factors may affect the counseling they receive. ‘The Soul Wound’ is the historical genocide of Native people and the generational trauma that comes from this history. Presenter will share a perspective on how Natives began to use their cultural heritage to help support those in their community with disabilities and addictions by way of drum circles, sweats, and other methods. The presentation will be a combination of historical videos and spoken word to give voice to a population that is underserved and nearly invisible as citizens. The goal is to illustrate the hope that all citizens, and future counselors, will learn to connect and be able to provide services with more empathy and an understanding that we cannot know what Native people have or are currently going through.

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Jun 1st, 2:00 PM Jun 1st, 2:15 PM

Indigenous Peoples and Psychotherapy ‘The Soul Wound’

RWEC 101

This project is intended to challenge us to use creativity in addressing the diversity context of the vocational rehabilitation field. Grasping the history of any oppressed person is critical for counselors to develop when working with clients who are members of an oppressed population. This presentation will discuss the Native American population, briefly address ‘The Soul Wound’, and how these historical factors may affect the counseling they receive. ‘The Soul Wound’ is the historical genocide of Native people and the generational trauma that comes from this history. Presenter will share a perspective on how Natives began to use their cultural heritage to help support those in their community with disabilities and addictions by way of drum circles, sweats, and other methods. The presentation will be a combination of historical videos and spoken word to give voice to a population that is underserved and nearly invisible as citizens. The goal is to illustrate the hope that all citizens, and future counselors, will learn to connect and be able to provide services with more empathy and an understanding that we cannot know what Native people have or are currently going through.