Title

Heathcliff, Hareton, and the Hounds

Date

6-1-2017 10:15 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 10:30 AM

Location

WUC Willamette Room

Department

English, Writing and Linguistics

Session Chair

Henry Hughes

Session Title

English, Writing and Linguistics

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kit Andrews

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Emily Brontë’s novel Wuthering Heights contains numerous references to dogs and doglike attributes. Be it bulldogs, pointers, spaniels, cropped ears, snarling, or growling, the reader of the novel is continuously hounded with canines. Through an examination of these reoccurring images in Wuthering Heights, I realized the significant connection between the mongrels and two male characters: Heathcliff and Hareton. The dogs in the novel are used to both amplify the personal characteristics of the two men, and to show the ways in which Heathcliff and Hareton are similar, yet different. Brontë’s use of canine imagery shows the true animalistic nature of Heathcliff, as well as the greater humanity of Hareton.

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Jun 1st, 10:15 AM Jun 1st, 10:30 AM

Heathcliff, Hareton, and the Hounds

WUC Willamette Room

Emily Brontë’s novel Wuthering Heights contains numerous references to dogs and doglike attributes. Be it bulldogs, pointers, spaniels, cropped ears, snarling, or growling, the reader of the novel is continuously hounded with canines. Through an examination of these reoccurring images in Wuthering Heights, I realized the significant connection between the mongrels and two male characters: Heathcliff and Hareton. The dogs in the novel are used to both amplify the personal characteristics of the two men, and to show the ways in which Heathcliff and Hareton are similar, yet different. Brontë’s use of canine imagery shows the true animalistic nature of Heathcliff, as well as the greater humanity of Hareton.