Title

Emergence Theory in the Human Immune System

Date

6-1-2017 3:15 PM

End Time

1-6-2017 3:30 PM

Location

WUC Columbia Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Jeff Snyder

Session Chair

Michael Baltzley

Session Title

The Kenneth M. Walker Scholarship in Biology Oral presentation Session

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Lars Soderlund

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The adaptive human immune system has been a source of fascination to the human race dating back as far as 430 BC, and its many intricacies and separately working systems make it an interesting challenge to researchers around the world. This presentation discusses the study of the immune system through the lens of emergence theory, a model that represents the ideas that simple interactions between the individual actants of a system can lead to patterns of macro-behavior. By focusing on how lymphocytes behave as the actants of the system, we can examine how altering either the number of actants, or their separate interactions can greatly affect the functioning of the system as a whole. The presentation will also examine autoimmune diseases, and how by focusing on the emergent behavior of the immune system, we can continue research on how to best treat these disorders of the system. By the end of the presentation, audience members will be familiar with a new paradigm for how systems function, have an increased awareness of how the immune system benefits us as individuals, and be ready to use the lessons of emergence to cultivate and continue discussions in their community.

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Jun 1st, 3:15 PM Jun 1st, 3:30 PM

Emergence Theory in the Human Immune System

WUC Columbia Room

The adaptive human immune system has been a source of fascination to the human race dating back as far as 430 BC, and its many intricacies and separately working systems make it an interesting challenge to researchers around the world. This presentation discusses the study of the immune system through the lens of emergence theory, a model that represents the ideas that simple interactions between the individual actants of a system can lead to patterns of macro-behavior. By focusing on how lymphocytes behave as the actants of the system, we can examine how altering either the number of actants, or their separate interactions can greatly affect the functioning of the system as a whole. The presentation will also examine autoimmune diseases, and how by focusing on the emergent behavior of the immune system, we can continue research on how to best treat these disorders of the system. By the end of the presentation, audience members will be familiar with a new paradigm for how systems function, have an increased awareness of how the immune system benefits us as individuals, and be ready to use the lessons of emergence to cultivate and continue discussions in their community.