Title

Using Artificial Selection To Understand Directional Orientation Behavior In Drosophila

Date

6-1-2017 3:00 PM

End Time

1-6-2017 3:15 PM

Location

WUC Columbia Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Jeff Snyder

Session Chair

Michael Baltzley

Session Title

The Kenneth M. Walker Scholarship in Biology Oral presentation Session

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kristin Latham

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Previous studies have shown that Drosophila melanogaster can orient using Earth-strength magnetic fields. In order to investigate the underlying mechanisms of magnetoreception, we used a sequential Y-maze to breed two groups of flies: a north-seeking population and a south-seeking population. After flies completed the maze, we collected and bred the top 20% of north- and south-seeking flies, then repeated the protocol for 15 generations. As a positive control, we also performed a similar set of selection experiments to breed populations of positive and negative phototaxic flies. Our results indicate that Drosophila show positive phototaxis and that our light-selected flies have a significantly stronger preference for light than our dark-selected flies (p < 0.05). Our results also indicate that the north- and south-selected flies both have a slight preference for choosing north within the maze. We are currently performing trials with wild type flies in a different testing room to confirm the north preference of the flies.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 1st, 3:00 PM Jun 1st, 3:15 PM

Using Artificial Selection To Understand Directional Orientation Behavior In Drosophila

WUC Columbia Room

Previous studies have shown that Drosophila melanogaster can orient using Earth-strength magnetic fields. In order to investigate the underlying mechanisms of magnetoreception, we used a sequential Y-maze to breed two groups of flies: a north-seeking population and a south-seeking population. After flies completed the maze, we collected and bred the top 20% of north- and south-seeking flies, then repeated the protocol for 15 generations. As a positive control, we also performed a similar set of selection experiments to breed populations of positive and negative phototaxic flies. Our results indicate that Drosophila show positive phototaxis and that our light-selected flies have a significantly stronger preference for light than our dark-selected flies (p < 0.05). Our results also indicate that the north- and south-selected flies both have a slight preference for choosing north within the maze. We are currently performing trials with wild type flies in a different testing room to confirm the north preference of the flies.