Title

Using Artificial Selection to Understand Orientation Behavior in Drosophila

Date

6-1-2017 11:00 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 1:00 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Jeff Snyder

Session Chair

Michael Baltzley

Session Title

The Kenneth M. Walker Scholarship in Biology poster Session

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kristin Latham

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

The ability of Drosophila melanogaster to orient using Earth-strength magnetic field is controversial. In order to explore the underlying mechanisms of magnetoreception, we subjected a wild-caught population of Drosophila to artificial selection. We used a sequential Y-maze to select north- and south-seeking flies over 15 generations. Using the same protocol, we also selected and bred populations of positively and negatively phototaxic flies to distinguish any bias in the Y-maze. After 15 generations, we completed 10 replicates of each line of flies. Our results show significantly stronger preference for light in our light-selected flies than in our dark-selected flies (p < 0.05). This confirms that we could successfully select for and bred fly populations using our Y-maze. Our results did not show a significant difference between north-selected and south-selected flies, but did indicate a preference for north in both populations. It is possible that the flies’ magnetoreception was due to the local environment rather than the magnetic field, so we changed the environment surrounding the maze and will complete 15 replicates using the original population of flies.

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Jun 1st, 11:00 AM Jun 1st, 1:00 PM

Using Artificial Selection to Understand Orientation Behavior in Drosophila

WUC Pacific Room

The ability of Drosophila melanogaster to orient using Earth-strength magnetic field is controversial. In order to explore the underlying mechanisms of magnetoreception, we subjected a wild-caught population of Drosophila to artificial selection. We used a sequential Y-maze to select north- and south-seeking flies over 15 generations. Using the same protocol, we also selected and bred populations of positively and negatively phototaxic flies to distinguish any bias in the Y-maze. After 15 generations, we completed 10 replicates of each line of flies. Our results show significantly stronger preference for light in our light-selected flies than in our dark-selected flies (p < 0.05). This confirms that we could successfully select for and bred fly populations using our Y-maze. Our results did not show a significant difference between north-selected and south-selected flies, but did indicate a preference for north in both populations. It is possible that the flies’ magnetoreception was due to the local environment rather than the magnetic field, so we changed the environment surrounding the maze and will complete 15 replicates using the original population of flies.