Title

Insight Into the Immune System: Drosophila Melanogaster VS. Pseudomonas Fluorescens

Date

6-1-2017 11:00 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 1:00 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Jeff Snyder

Session Chair

Michael Baltzley

Session Title

The Kenneth M. Walker Scholarship in Biology poster Session

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kristin Latham

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Drosophila melanogaster, the fruit fly, is a model organism with genetic applications and an accelerated life cycle making it an ideal subject for developmental and immune system research. There has been little research investigating the lethal and non-lethal responses of flies infected with bacteria early in development. To further the knowledge on the early developmental responses of their immune system, previous research examined larvae that were exposed to a typically encountered soil bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens. It was hypothesized that ingesting the bacteria would cause growth delays coupled with high mortality. To further study the toxic effect of bacteria on the innate immunity of Drosophila melanogaster, we sought to clone the gene ChiC from Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. This gene encodes a chitinase enzyme in bacteria suspected to be a toxin to Drosophila larvae. We then will extract the protein product to feed to Drosophila larvae and assess the developmental effect.In further applications, this research could give insight to the innate immune response exhibited in humans to bacterial infections.

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Jun 1st, 11:00 AM Jun 1st, 1:00 PM

Insight Into the Immune System: Drosophila Melanogaster VS. Pseudomonas Fluorescens

WUC Pacific Room

Drosophila melanogaster, the fruit fly, is a model organism with genetic applications and an accelerated life cycle making it an ideal subject for developmental and immune system research. There has been little research investigating the lethal and non-lethal responses of flies infected with bacteria early in development. To further the knowledge on the early developmental responses of their immune system, previous research examined larvae that were exposed to a typically encountered soil bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens. It was hypothesized that ingesting the bacteria would cause growth delays coupled with high mortality. To further study the toxic effect of bacteria on the innate immunity of Drosophila melanogaster, we sought to clone the gene ChiC from Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. This gene encodes a chitinase enzyme in bacteria suspected to be a toxin to Drosophila larvae. We then will extract the protein product to feed to Drosophila larvae and assess the developmental effect.In further applications, this research could give insight to the innate immune response exhibited in humans to bacterial infections.