Title

Speaking in Tongues: How Translators Use the Language of the People in Bible Translation

Date

6-1-2017 9:15 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 9:30 AM

Location

WUC Willamette Room

Department

English, Writing and Linguistics

Session Chair

Henry Hughes

Session Title

English, Writing and Linguistics

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Cornelia Paraskevas

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Historically, the Bible was only available in the language of the educated, but over the centuries, there have been numerous efforts to bring the Bible into the language of the people. In recent years, there have been a number of projects to simplify the biblical text to make its language more manageable for a wider readership. The current research project compares four Bible translations – two standard versions and two simplified translations. Comparing the frequency of grammatical features such as verbs, nouns, prepositional phrases, and clauses, this study reveals how translations differ in their approach to make the Bible more accessible. The findings from this project reveal not only linguistic choices in translation, but they also shed light on what makes one text easier to read than another.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 1st, 9:15 AM Jun 1st, 9:30 AM

Speaking in Tongues: How Translators Use the Language of the People in Bible Translation

WUC Willamette Room

Historically, the Bible was only available in the language of the educated, but over the centuries, there have been numerous efforts to bring the Bible into the language of the people. In recent years, there have been a number of projects to simplify the biblical text to make its language more manageable for a wider readership. The current research project compares four Bible translations – two standard versions and two simplified translations. Comparing the frequency of grammatical features such as verbs, nouns, prepositional phrases, and clauses, this study reveals how translations differ in their approach to make the Bible more accessible. The findings from this project reveal not only linguistic choices in translation, but they also shed light on what makes one text easier to read than another.