Title

Roman Mime

Date

6-1-2017 10:15 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 10:30 AM

Location

WUC Santiam Room

Department

Theatre

Session Chair

Michael Phillips

Session Title

Theatre History Paper presentations

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Michael Phillips

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Ancient Rome was filled with all sorts of popular entertainment. Mime and pantomime began to grow popular, having appeared in Rome around 212 B.C.E. Roman mime was inspired by Greek mime, which consisted of all sorts of entertainment. The Romans adopted this, creating a similar style of mime to take place at the Floralia. Mime could be performed at any time or place, allowing for freedom of mime troupes to move about. These troupes could be a collective of all sorts of performers. Generally presentations were improvised, including two or three actors playing to a common theme. Mime brought several new changes into Roman theatre performance, including the addition of female actors. Another important change was the removal of masks. Government involvement helped the growth of mime’s popularity far beyond that of traditional drama. However, even with all of the popular support of mime, the performers were of even lower status than dramatic actors. Mime was a prevalent form of entertainment in Rome that not only took the spotlight from traditional drama but changed several aspects of performance, with the exclusion of masks and the inclusion of women on the stage.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 1st, 10:15 AM Jun 1st, 10:30 AM

Roman Mime

WUC Santiam Room

Ancient Rome was filled with all sorts of popular entertainment. Mime and pantomime began to grow popular, having appeared in Rome around 212 B.C.E. Roman mime was inspired by Greek mime, which consisted of all sorts of entertainment. The Romans adopted this, creating a similar style of mime to take place at the Floralia. Mime could be performed at any time or place, allowing for freedom of mime troupes to move about. These troupes could be a collective of all sorts of performers. Generally presentations were improvised, including two or three actors playing to a common theme. Mime brought several new changes into Roman theatre performance, including the addition of female actors. Another important change was the removal of masks. Government involvement helped the growth of mime’s popularity far beyond that of traditional drama. However, even with all of the popular support of mime, the performers were of even lower status than dramatic actors. Mime was a prevalent form of entertainment in Rome that not only took the spotlight from traditional drama but changed several aspects of performance, with the exclusion of masks and the inclusion of women on the stage.