Title

A Corpus-Based Comparison of College Argumentative Essays Written by Americans and Chinese Learners of English

Date

6-1-2017 10:00 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 10:15 AM

Location

WUC Willamette Room

Department

English, Writing and Linguistics

Session Chair

Henry Hughes

Session Title

English, Writing and Linguistics

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Robert Troyer

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

In order to gain a better understanding of the differences between argumentative essays written by native English speakers and Chinese EFL speakers of English at a college level, the author conducted this corpus-based study. Another purpose of this study was to determine the extent of the author’s English language proficiency and the nature of her writing style. Influenced by Hyland’s idea of corpus studies of academic writing using the techniques of frequency, keyness, concordance, and annotation, the author utilized and interpreted the complex, multifaceted nature of English argumentative writing among Chinese speakers. Applying a research method of corpus-based analysis on various linguistic features of argumentative essays, the author compared 50 papers for each sub-corpus written by three groups (native English speakers, Chinese learners of English, and the author). The group differences of linguistic features among three groups represent word frequency, vocabulary variations, punctuation variations, semantic analysis, grammatical analysis, and multidimensional analysis.

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Jun 1st, 10:00 AM Jun 1st, 10:15 AM

A Corpus-Based Comparison of College Argumentative Essays Written by Americans and Chinese Learners of English

WUC Willamette Room

In order to gain a better understanding of the differences between argumentative essays written by native English speakers and Chinese EFL speakers of English at a college level, the author conducted this corpus-based study. Another purpose of this study was to determine the extent of the author’s English language proficiency and the nature of her writing style. Influenced by Hyland’s idea of corpus studies of academic writing using the techniques of frequency, keyness, concordance, and annotation, the author utilized and interpreted the complex, multifaceted nature of English argumentative writing among Chinese speakers. Applying a research method of corpus-based analysis on various linguistic features of argumentative essays, the author compared 50 papers for each sub-corpus written by three groups (native English speakers, Chinese learners of English, and the author). The group differences of linguistic features among three groups represent word frequency, vocabulary variations, punctuation variations, semantic analysis, grammatical analysis, and multidimensional analysis.