Title

ADHD Review: Neurobiological Characterization, Stimulant Biotransformation Processes and Neurochemical Response Mechanisms

Date

6-1-2017 10:45 AM

End Time

1-6-2017 11:30 AM

Location

NS 101

Department

Chemistry

Session Chair

Arlene Courtney

Session Title

Chemistry Capstone Seminars

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Arlene Courtney

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is currently recognized to have three types of presentations (pre-dominantly hyperactive/impulsive, pre-dominantly inattentive, and combined). The exact nature of the neurobiological causes that underlie ADHD is not entirely understood. This presentation serves to overview the current understanding of ADHD that has been determined via the use of animal models, gene interaction studies, neuroimaging, and drug pharmacological research. Side-by-side comparisons of Adderall and the prodrug Lisdexamfetamine will be discussed in detail, focusing on metabolism and the drug induced neurochemical response associated with each of the pharmacologically active amphetamine isomers (l- and d-amphetamine).

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Jun 1st, 10:45 AM Jun 1st, 11:30 AM

ADHD Review: Neurobiological Characterization, Stimulant Biotransformation Processes and Neurochemical Response Mechanisms

NS 101

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is currently recognized to have three types of presentations (pre-dominantly hyperactive/impulsive, pre-dominantly inattentive, and combined). The exact nature of the neurobiological causes that underlie ADHD is not entirely understood. This presentation serves to overview the current understanding of ADHD that has been determined via the use of animal models, gene interaction studies, neuroimaging, and drug pharmacological research. Side-by-side comparisons of Adderall and the prodrug Lisdexamfetamine will be discussed in detail, focusing on metabolism and the drug induced neurochemical response associated with each of the pharmacologically active amphetamine isomers (l- and d-amphetamine).