Title

The Causes of Tectonic Deformation and Extension of the Basin and Range

Date

6-1-2017 3:00 PM

End Time

1-6-2017 4:00 PM

Location

RWEC 201

Department

Earth Science

Session Chair

Jeffrey Templeton

Session Title

Earth Science Senior Seminar: Understanding the Tectonic Development and Framework of western North America

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Jeffrey Templeton

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The Basin and Range is characterized by a complex geologic history during the Cenozoic, which has been dominated by volcanism and normal faulting since ~12 Ma. The tectonic forces driving this deformation and uplift have played a significant role in the Cenozoic evolution of the Basin and Range. Determining what has caused the wide-spread extension of the Basin and Range has yielded a variety of postulated models. Digital elevation models (DEM) have been used to study the westward migration of extensional faulting in Nevada and in the Warner Range in California. Extension, which has produced high-angle normal faults, along with shearing, accounts for 15-25% of the motion between the Pacific and North American plates. This could account for the high-angle normal faulting along with the low magnitude extension and thickening of the crust in this region. These models also provide evidence for interpreting the relationship between the Basin and Range and Yellowstone hotspot volcanism.

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Jun 1st, 3:00 PM Jun 1st, 4:00 PM

The Causes of Tectonic Deformation and Extension of the Basin and Range

RWEC 201

The Basin and Range is characterized by a complex geologic history during the Cenozoic, which has been dominated by volcanism and normal faulting since ~12 Ma. The tectonic forces driving this deformation and uplift have played a significant role in the Cenozoic evolution of the Basin and Range. Determining what has caused the wide-spread extension of the Basin and Range has yielded a variety of postulated models. Digital elevation models (DEM) have been used to study the westward migration of extensional faulting in Nevada and in the Warner Range in California. Extension, which has produced high-angle normal faults, along with shearing, accounts for 15-25% of the motion between the Pacific and North American plates. This could account for the high-angle normal faulting along with the low magnitude extension and thickening of the crust in this region. These models also provide evidence for interpreting the relationship between the Basin and Range and Yellowstone hotspot volcanism.