Title

Inferring Tectonic Processes, Magmatism, and Emplacement Mechanisms through Petrologic Studies of the Sierra Nevada Batholith

Date

6-1-2017 1:00 PM

End Time

1-6-2017 2:00 PM

Location

RWEC 201

Department

Earth Science

Session Chair

Jeffrey Templeton

Session Title

Earth Science Senior Seminar: Understanding the Tectonic Development and Framework of western North America

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Jeffrey Templeton

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The Sierra Nevada, framed by the Great Valley and the Basin and Range, is a mountain range over 950 km long and 110 km wide located in eastern California. At the core of the range is the Sierra Nevada Batholith (SNB), consisting of numerous plutons that began forming in the late Triassic. The various rock types and minerals composing the SNB provide a record of the magmatic processes that lead to its formation. The sheer size of the batholith begs the question: what is the magma source and how does this relate to the composition of the batholith. The origin of the SNB is associated with subduction of the Farallon Plate beneath North America between 210 and 80 Ma. The compositional variations across the SNB provide evidence for whether discrete plutons formed due to incremental accumulation of magma or if they formed due to bulk magma flow. The lithologic characteristics of individual plutons illustrate the relationships between tectonic environment, magmatism, emplacement mechanisms, and resulting compositions of the SNB.

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Jun 1st, 1:00 PM Jun 1st, 2:00 PM

Inferring Tectonic Processes, Magmatism, and Emplacement Mechanisms through Petrologic Studies of the Sierra Nevada Batholith

RWEC 201

The Sierra Nevada, framed by the Great Valley and the Basin and Range, is a mountain range over 950 km long and 110 km wide located in eastern California. At the core of the range is the Sierra Nevada Batholith (SNB), consisting of numerous plutons that began forming in the late Triassic. The various rock types and minerals composing the SNB provide a record of the magmatic processes that lead to its formation. The sheer size of the batholith begs the question: what is the magma source and how does this relate to the composition of the batholith. The origin of the SNB is associated with subduction of the Farallon Plate beneath North America between 210 and 80 Ma. The compositional variations across the SNB provide evidence for whether discrete plutons formed due to incremental accumulation of magma or if they formed due to bulk magma flow. The lithologic characteristics of individual plutons illustrate the relationships between tectonic environment, magmatism, emplacement mechanisms, and resulting compositions of the SNB.