Title

Technical Documentation & Service Delivery: A Study of the Efficiency of Documented Technical Knowledge and Its Effects on Incident Management Troubleshooting in a Healthcare Organization

Date

5-26-2016 8:30 AM

End Time

26-5-2016 10:30 AM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Computer Science

Session Chair

Scot Morse

Session Chair

Mitch Fry

Session Title

Computer Science, Information Systems and M.S. in Management and Information Systems Student Projects

Faculty Sponsor(s)

John Marsaglia

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

This research project involves discovering if documentation aids troubleshooting during the Incident Management process. The goal is to show that technical documentation needs to be dynamic, well-organized, and utilized properly to make a change in efficiency. This has been done by analyzing incident data regarding 22 software applications that has documentation pertaining to incident resolutions. This data has been quantified and set against a timeline of documentation source implementations spanning across a time period of three years. Upon the conclusion of this analysis, it is clear that efficiency is effected when documentation is introduced, amassed, and reviewed even while incident quantity is increasing progressively. Through showing that documentation affects efficiency, this project emphasizes the importance of maintaining strong documentation standards in regards to Incident Management troubleshooting, as defined by ITIL.

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May 26th, 8:30 AM May 26th, 10:30 AM

Technical Documentation & Service Delivery: A Study of the Efficiency of Documented Technical Knowledge and Its Effects on Incident Management Troubleshooting in a Healthcare Organization

WUC Pacific Room

This research project involves discovering if documentation aids troubleshooting during the Incident Management process. The goal is to show that technical documentation needs to be dynamic, well-organized, and utilized properly to make a change in efficiency. This has been done by analyzing incident data regarding 22 software applications that has documentation pertaining to incident resolutions. This data has been quantified and set against a timeline of documentation source implementations spanning across a time period of three years. Upon the conclusion of this analysis, it is clear that efficiency is effected when documentation is introduced, amassed, and reviewed even while incident quantity is increasing progressively. Through showing that documentation affects efficiency, this project emphasizes the importance of maintaining strong documentation standards in regards to Incident Management troubleshooting, as defined by ITIL.