Title

Quantum Dots: A Bright Future Ahead

Date

5-26-2016 4:45 PM

End Time

26-5-2016 5:30 PM

Location

Natural Sciences (NS) 101

Department

Chemistry

Session Chair

Arlene Courtney

Session Title

Chemistry Capstone Seminars

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Arlene Courtney

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Since their discovery in 1980 by Russian physicist Ekimov, Quantum Dots have been in constant advancement in many interesting fields of science. They have potential for many practical applications such as optical storage, LEDs, organic dyes, quantum computing, and solar power. Tunable emission peaks, long lasting fluorescence, and their ability to be conjugated with biomolecules such as proteins allow them to be ideal molecules for the application of bioimaging. The fluorescent properties of Quantum Dots can be applied in cancer therapy. By using Quantum Dots in live cell imaging, doctors can see malignant tumors, and healthy cells, glow before their eyes, facilitating the removal process and preventing the damage of healthy cells in the process. This seminar will explore the chemistry and physics behind these new and revolutionary semiconductor nanocrystals and their applications while also addressing some of the setbacks encountered in their development and use in the medical field.

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May 26th, 4:45 PM May 26th, 5:30 PM

Quantum Dots: A Bright Future Ahead

Natural Sciences (NS) 101

Since their discovery in 1980 by Russian physicist Ekimov, Quantum Dots have been in constant advancement in many interesting fields of science. They have potential for many practical applications such as optical storage, LEDs, organic dyes, quantum computing, and solar power. Tunable emission peaks, long lasting fluorescence, and their ability to be conjugated with biomolecules such as proteins allow them to be ideal molecules for the application of bioimaging. The fluorescent properties of Quantum Dots can be applied in cancer therapy. By using Quantum Dots in live cell imaging, doctors can see malignant tumors, and healthy cells, glow before their eyes, facilitating the removal process and preventing the damage of healthy cells in the process. This seminar will explore the chemistry and physics behind these new and revolutionary semiconductor nanocrystals and their applications while also addressing some of the setbacks encountered in their development and use in the medical field.