Title

The Role of Chitinase in the Lethality of Pseudomonas Infection in Drosophila melanogaster.

Date

5-26-2016 11:00 AM

End Time

26-5-2016 1:00 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Chemistry

Session Chair

Patricia Flatt

Session Title

Biochemistry and Forensic Science

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Patricia Flatt

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Pseudomonas fluorescens is a soil-dwelling, gram-negative bacterium that is part of a larger group of Pseudomonads, known for their effectiveness as biocontrol agents. Several Pseudomonas species, including P. fluorescens, have been shown to suppress plant disease. This function is thought to involve the diverse secondary metabolite production of this group. Several genes involved in insect toxicity have also been identified in P. fluorescens, but these do not completely account for toxicity. One gene we have identified as a potential source of toxicity is chiC, which codes for the enzyme chitinase. This enzyme is of particular interest here because of the key role of chitin regulation in insect development. Our group is interested in elucidating the mechanisms of P. fluorescens toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster, particularly in regard to the potential role of chitinase. To pursue this line of inquiry, we are in the process of isolating and cloning chitinase and chitin-binding protein genes from P. fluorescens PF-5 and P. fluorescens A506.

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May 26th, 11:00 AM May 26th, 1:00 PM

The Role of Chitinase in the Lethality of Pseudomonas Infection in Drosophila melanogaster.

WUC Pacific Room

Pseudomonas fluorescens is a soil-dwelling, gram-negative bacterium that is part of a larger group of Pseudomonads, known for their effectiveness as biocontrol agents. Several Pseudomonas species, including P. fluorescens, have been shown to suppress plant disease. This function is thought to involve the diverse secondary metabolite production of this group. Several genes involved in insect toxicity have also been identified in P. fluorescens, but these do not completely account for toxicity. One gene we have identified as a potential source of toxicity is chiC, which codes for the enzyme chitinase. This enzyme is of particular interest here because of the key role of chitin regulation in insect development. Our group is interested in elucidating the mechanisms of P. fluorescens toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster, particularly in regard to the potential role of chitinase. To pursue this line of inquiry, we are in the process of isolating and cloning chitinase and chitin-binding protein genes from P. fluorescens PF-5 and P. fluorescens A506.